CGI U 2014 Meeting Agenda

March 21 – March 23 at Arizona State University

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* All times below are Pacific
 
Plenary Session
 

9:00 AM -

 10:15 AM


Coming in Second: Scaling What Works

There is no shortage of proven solutions to many of the world’s most seemingly intractable problems. Yet rather than scaling up existing programs with established track records, many funders and founders continue to launch new organizations and spearhead new initiatives in search of the next game-changing startup or breakthrough idea. How can social innovators better recognize opportunities to join forces with organizations that possess the existing infrastructure and similar theories of change? If measurable impact is the ultimate goal, should students focus less on starting up and more on scaling up? Are solutions to illiteracy, climate change, or HIV/AIDS truly transferable from one location or community to another in the way that a fast food franchise can expand across a region? This session will bring together grassroots entrepreneurs, NGO leaders, and private sector representatives to explore the challenges, costs, and benefits of scaling up successful solutions.

Moderator:

Chelsea Clinton, Vice Chair, Clinton Foundation

Participants:

Bill Drayton, Chief Executive Officer, Ashoka
Katie Smith Milway, Partner, Head of Knowledge, The Bridgespan Group
Deogratias Niyizonkiza, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Village Health Works
Rosario Pérez, President and Chief Executive Officer, Pro Mujer

 
Skill Sessions
 

10:45 AM -

 12:00 PM


Building Your Team: Strengthening Organizational Leadership and Capacity

Limited personnel and organizational capacity can significantly reduce the ability of CGI U participants to carry out their commitments and bring them to scale. This session will introduce strategies for managing and building a staff, as well as recruiting, organizing, and retaining an engaged volunteer team. In addition, students will learn how to expand their reach and impact by identifying and securing partnerships within the campus community and beyond with local nonprofit organizations and other community entities.

Participants:

Lily Cole, Founder, impossible
Doug Scott, Associate Principal, McKinsey and Company

Creating Buzz: Using Social Media to Market Your Cause

Beyond a quick press release or an article in the school newspaper, what are some creative ways to raise the profile of the work done by CGI U participants? This session will focus on innovative digital organizing strategies for creating cohesive marketing campaigns and maximizing online engagement.

Participants:

Adam Hirsch, Executive Vice President, Emerging Media and Technology, Edelman Digital
Courtney Spence, Founder, Students of the World

Driving Results: Monitoring and Evaluating Your Project

How can CGI U participants ensure that their commitments are achieving tangible progress and fulfilling their mission? This session will explore measurement and evaluation methods that can enhance the quality and effectiveness of commitments, enable attendees to identify potential design flaws, and improve upon existing strategies to inform future efforts.

Participants:

Ken Berger, President and Chief Executive Officer, Charity Navigator
Kosar Jahani, Impact Manager, SamaUSA, Samasource

Raising Money for Your Commitment

This session will explore the wide range of funding opportunities and resources available to CGI U participants. Key themes of this session will include grant writing, online fundraising tools, existing funding opportunities both on and off campus, and other innovative and effective fundraising strategies.

Participants:

Adnan Mahmud, Chief Executive Officer, Live Stories
Sarah McDevitt, Program Manager, Microsoft Citizenship
James Rooney, Senior Manager, Technology for Good

 
Working Sessions
 

10:45 AM -

 12:00 PM


Beyond Entertainment: Gaming for Health

Public Health

Technology is fundamentally changing the way in which people live, work, and play. Around the world, people spend nearly three billion hours per week playing online games. On average, there are more than 500 million people worldwide playing computer and video games at least an hour a day, with 183 million in the U.S. alone. As computer and video games become one of the fastest growing media platforms, experts, hospitals, and medical professionals are using this medium to address some of the world’s most complex public health challenges. Some video games feature yoga, strength training, aerobics, and other physical activities to engage users in fitness play. The popular Re-Mission video game, which was developed for teens and young adults with cancer, has increased levels of cancer-related knowledge and has improved adherence to treatment regimens. From managing chronic diseases to detecting disease outbreaks, this session will highlight successful initiatives that use health-based game technologies, and will explore how students can develop and use games to address global health problems.

Reading Materials

Can a Facebook Game Change the World? Ask Asi Burak, Rebecca Huval, PBS
A Video Game Where Players Help Real Doctors Diagnose Malaria, Brian Fung, The Atlantic
The Game That can Give you 10 Extra Years of Life, Jane McGonigal, TED
Can Video Games be Designed to Promote Health?, Richard Tate, HopeLab Blog

Moderator:

Tina Barseghian, Editor, Mindshift

Participants:

Bethany Bryant, Vice President, Digitalmill and Games for Health Project
Asi Burak, President, Games for Change
James Levine, Co-director, Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University Obesity Solutions Initiative

Diaspora-Driven Development: Youth Investing across Borders

Poverty Alleviation

From Somalis in Kenya to Hurricane Katrina survivors in Texas, more than 215 million people around the world belong to diaspora communities. In 2012, remittances from diaspora communities totaled over $534 billion, three times more than the official development assistance provided to developing countries. Diaspora networks are one of the strongest drivers of economic development in low-income areas, and young people themselves contribute to these communities in significant ways. From volunteering with emergency relief services in Syria to training HIV educators in Zambia, diaspora youth are increasingly drawn to invest in the human capital of their communities of origin. This panel will highlight how young diaspora members, particularly young women, are creatively leveraging their transnational identity to improve the lives of people back home.

Reading Materials

The world economy: the Magic of Diasporas, The Economist
How the African Diaspora is using Social Media to influence development, The Guardian UK

Moderator:

Maria Elena Salinas, Anchor, Univision News

Participants:

Vanessa Cárdenas, Vice President, Progress 2050, Center for American Progress
Manjula Dissanayake, Founding President, Educate Lanka Foundation, Inc.
Eric-Vincent Guichard, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Homestrings

Entrepreneurship Education: Nurturing the Next Generation of Innovators

Education

Nearly three decades ago, about 250 college courses taught entrepreneurship at U.S. colleges and universities. By 2008, 5,000 such courses were offered at two- and four-year institutions. Despite the growing interest among college students in this field, relatively few high schools have integrated entrepreneurship education into their curricula. Most high school dropouts leave school because they are not interested in their classes, and cite a lack of motivation to do the related work. Yet students who have participated in entrepreneurship programs demonstrate a substantial increase in their occupational aspirations and their interest in attending college. When entrepreneurship education is offered at an early age, it can prepare youth to be responsible, enterprising individuals by immersing them in real-world, hands-on learning experiences. This panel will bring together experts and practitioners who are creating opportunities for youth to be immersed in entrepreneurial work as part of the transition into post-secondary opportunities.

Reading Materials

"Entrepreneurial Mindset", Gary Schoeniger, Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation
"Are We Wasting Entrepreneurship Education on the Young?", Michelle Wright, Huffington Post
The Young App-rentices: Five App Developers Ages 16 and Under, Addy Dugdale, Fast Company

Moderator:

Sethuraman Panchanathan, Senior Vice President for Knowledge Enterprise Development, Arizona State University

Participants:

Sujata Bhatt, Founder, The Incubator School
Greg Gunn, Entrepreneur in Residence, City Light Capital
Nithin Jilla, Founder, Kenya Dream Branch at UC Irvine; Co-project Manager, AppJam+
Lisa Miller, Chief Growth Officer, Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship (NFTE)

Sustainable Solutions to Water Scarcity

Environment and Climate Change

More than 2.1 billion people live in deserts and dry lands, which make up at least 40 percent of Earth’s land surface. Climate change intensifies the likelihood and rate that dry lands are subject to desertification, which further reduces the availability of water and degrades the land quality and ecosystem. In light of these challenges, this panel will look at opportunities for sustainable water access and management tools for desert and dryland communities. From rooftop water harvesting to drip irrigation, this conversation will focus on regional efforts, individual projects, and indigenous peoples’ involvement in addressing water scarcity, and will explore how students can launch their own impactful projects and products in this field.

Reading Materials

An Arid Arizona City Manages its Thirst, Fernanda Santos, The New York Times
ASU's Water in Depth, ASU Knowledge Enterprise Development
A Bath Without Water, Ludwick Marishane, TED
The Navajo Water Access Project, DIGDEEP

Moderator:

Nancy Sutley, Former Chair, White House Council on Environmental Quality

Participants:

Wahleah Johns, Solar Project Coordinator, Black Mesa Water Coalition
George McGraw, Executive Director, DIGDEEP Water
Dave White, Associate Professor, Arizona State University

Transitional Justice in Post-Conflict Societies

Peace and Human Rights

After the wars end and the human rights abuses are exposed, what happens next? When nations transition away from long-term violence and repression, how can they effectively rebuild social trust and create a democratic system of governance? The very notion of transitional justice can differ widely depending on the national, cultural, and situational biases of each case. Some look to the International Criminal Court or other tribunals as with Sudan, Uganda, Congo, Kenya, Rwanda, and Bosnia. Others look to South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission, along with the post-conflict processes in Guatemala, East Timor, Peru, and Argentina. Sierra Leone and Cambodia have looked to a mixture of both strategies. This panel will explore how a holistic set of responses have been designed to help nations and citizens respond to abuses. Participants will discuss the tangible ways in which young people can help communities climb out of the infamous “conflict trap.”

Reading Materials

Transitional Justice: Global Mechanisms and Local Realities after Genocide and Mass Violence, Professor Alexander Laban Hinton
Peace versus Justice?, Chandra Lekha Sriram
D.I.Y. Foreign-Aid Revolution, Nicholas Kristof, The New York Times
Lecture on "Post-conflict and Transitional Justice"

Moderator:

Kevin Bleyer, Emmy Award-Winning Writer and Producer, The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, Dennis Miller, Politically Incorrect with Bill Maher

Participants:

Emily Arnold-Fernandez, Executive Director, Asylum Access
Tin Ma Ma Htet, Teacher Trainer, Monastic Education Development Group
Cindy Hensley McCain, Founding Member, Eastern Congo Initiative
Joseph Munyambanza, Co-founder and Education Director, COBURWAS International Youth Organization to Transform Africa

 
Networking Event
 

12:15 PM -

 1:15 PM


Lunch

 
Office Hours
 

12:15 PM -

 1:15 PM


Office Hours with Select Program Participants

Participants:

Asi Burak, President, Games for Change
Bill Drayton, Chief Executive Officer, Ashoka
Khalid Fellahi, Senior Vice President and General Manager, Western Union Digital
Andy Nahas, President, The Prospect Fund
Jenny Norton, Social Justice Minister and Chaplain, Ramsey Social Justice Foundation
Jamar Rogers, Musician, Dream On Productions, HIV/AIDS Activist
Rosario Pérez, President and Chief Executive Officer, Pro Mujer
Bunker Roy, Founder and Director, The Barefoot College
Nancy Sutley, Former Chair, White House Council on Environmental Quality
Michael Tubbs, Council Member, City of Stockton

 
Plenary Session
 

1:45 PM -

 3:00 PM


The Future of Higher Education: Redefining Learning As We Know It

As the global demand for education increases and the cost of college continues to rise, the need for more accessible and innovative models of higher education is greater than ever. A surge in digital learning resources—from accredited massive open online courses to informal YouTube tutorials—has dramatically expanded access to educational content around the world and could fundamentally redefine what it means to be a student. However, access to information alone is not always enough to boost learning outcomes, prepare students of all socioeconomic backgrounds for the job market, and cultivate the skills necessary to be a productive 21st century citizen. How can educational systems provide all young people with the tools to succeed at college and how can higher education institutions, from community colleges to four-year universities, better provide the development of high-demand skills for employment and societal participation? This session will bring together entrepreneurs, innovators, and educators to discuss how higher education can become more accessible and effective.

Remarks:

Hillary Rodham Clinton, Former U.S. Secretary of State and U.S. Senator from New York

Moderator:

Mitzi Montoya, Vice President and University Dean for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Arizona State University

Participants:

Nikhil Goyal, Author, Activist
Austin Obasohan, Superintendent of Schools, Duplin County Schools
Reeta Roy, President and Chief Executive Officer, The MasterCard Foundation
Bunker Roy, Founder and Director, The Barefoot College

 
Skill Sessions
 

3:30 PM -

 4:45 PM


Building Your Team: Strengthening Organizational Leadership and Capacity

Limited personnel and organizational capacity can significantly reduce the ability of CGI U participants to carry out their commitments and bring them to scale. This session will introduce strategies for managing and building a staff, as well as recruiting, organizing, and retaining an engaged volunteer team. In addition, students will learn how to expand their reach and impact by identifying and securing partnerships within the campus community and beyond with local nonprofit organizations and other community entities.

Participants:

Gloria Blackwell, Vice President of Fellowships, Grants, and Global Programs, American Association of University Women
Susmita De, Co-founder and COO, nonprofit-share

Creating Buzz: Using Social Media to Market Your Cause

Beyond a quick press release or an article in the school newspaper, what are some creative ways to raise the profile of the work done by CGI U participants? This session will focus on innovative digital organizing strategies for creating cohesive marketing campaigns and maximizing online engagement.

Participants:

David Clark, Founder, David Clark Cause, Inc.
Katelyn Mack, Senior Consultant, FSG

Driving Results: Monitoring and Evaluating Your Project

How can CGI U participants ensure that their commitments are achieving tangible progress and fulfilling their mission? This session will explore measurement and evaluation methods that can enhance the quality and effectiveness of commitments, enable attendees to identify potential design flaws, and improve upon existing strategies to inform future efforts.

Participants:

Ruchira Gupta, Founder and President, Apne Aap Women Worldwide
Patrick Walsh, Co-founder and Chief Impact Officer, CLASSY Awards

Raising Money for Your Commitment

This session will explore the wide range of funding opportunities and resources available to CGI U participants. Key themes of this session will include grant writing, online fundraising tools, existing funding opportunities both on and off campus, and other innovative and effective fundraising strategies.

Participants:

Premal Shah, President, KIVA
Gary Wohlfeill, Director of Marketing, CrowdRise

 
Working Sessions
 

3:30 PM -

 4:45 PM


Broken Barriers: Protecting Immigrant and Refugee Rights

Peace and Human Rights

Over the past fifteen years, immigration rates to the U.S. have reached levels unmatched since the early 1900s. In 1990, 1 in 12 Americans was an immigrant, and by 2005 that proportion rose to 1 in 8. From its impact on the economy to its impact on social and cultural politics, immigrant and refugee rights have generated significant debate both in the U.S. and around the world. While policymakers struggle to pass comprehensive immigration reform legislation, it’s difficult to ignore the ways that immigrants contribute skills, knowledge, and labor to economies. And with over 1.5 million undocumented students currently residing in the U.S., recent legislative efforts may have halted future deportation of young undocumented people who match certain criteria, but the promise of school and work opportunities still remains unclear. This panel will discuss the challenges to improving immigration systems around the world and will assess the ways in which young people can work to formally integrate and welcome new members into communities.

Reading Materials

Civic Infographic
Dignity Denied: LGBT Immigrants in U.S. Immigration Detention, Center for American Progress
The End of Refugee Camps?, Guglielmo Verdirame and Jason M. Pobjoy
Refugees' Rights to Work, Emily Arnold-Fernández and Stewart Pollock, Refugees’ rights to work

Moderator:

Alicia Menendez, Host, Fusion

Participants:

Christina Fialho, Co-founder and Executive Director, Community Initiatives for Visiting Immigrants in Confinement (CIVIC)
Dulce Matuz, President, Arizona DREAM Act Coalition
Katherine Reisner, National Policy Director, Iraqi Refugee Assistance Project

Learning Behind Bars: Expanding Educational Opportunity in Prisons

Education

In the United States, incarceration is a pandemic: 1 in 15 Americans will be incarcerated, and two-thirds of former prisoners return to prison. Inmates who engage in education programs in prison are 43 percent less likely to recidivate and return to prison than their fellow inmates. The acquisition of academic and vocational knowledge and skills is essential to finding employment upon release. Being employed reduces recidivism, and creates a viable pathway back into society. This panel will examine efforts in the U.S. and around the world to implement educational and other pro-social programs that seek to increase prisoner skills for life in and beyond prison. Participants will gain a better understanding of the promises and challenges of promoting and expanding access to high-quality educational opportunities within the prison system.

Reading Materials

Breaking The Prison Cycle Through Education [Infographic], Knewton
"Why Prisoner Education Is Key to Reducing Crime", Mike Riggs, The Atlantic
"Why Prison Education?", Prison Studies Project

Moderator:

Cornelia Wells, Lecturer, Arizona State Unversity

Participants:

Mark Johnson, Founder, User Voice
Jenny Norton, Social Justice Minister and Chaplain, Ramsey Social Justice Foundation
Michael Tubbs, Council Member, City of Stockton

The HIV/AIDS Epidemic in the United States

Public Health

More than one million people are living with HIV/AIDS in the United States, and every nine-and-a-half minutes, someone else in the U.S. is infected with the disease. One in five of those living with HIV/AIDS do not know their status. In Washington, D.C.—the epicenter of the epidemic in the U.S.—3 percent of all city residents suffer from HIV/AIDS, and African Americans account for 86 percent of all new cases within the district. Even though treatment for the disease is available, accessing these medications and receiving consistent care and follow-up remains a challenge for many who remain marginalized by the U.S. healthcare system. Yet new research in prevention strategies has re-energized efforts to stem the epidemic domestically, and public health experts continue to implement innovative approaches to ensure access to HIV/AIDS care and treatment. This panel will feature practitioners and visionaries who are leading groundbreaking efforts to address the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the US.

Reading Materials

The Many States of HIV in America, Jon Cohen, Science Magazine
Poor Black and Hispanic Men Are the Face of H.I.V., Donald McNeil Jr., The New York Times
America Without HIV/AIDS in Women: A Wish for this national Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, Susan Blumenthal, Huffington Post
AIDS -- the South's shame, Lisa Biagiotti, Los Angeles Times

Moderator:

Lisa Biagiotti, Journalist and Filmmaker, deepsouth

Participants:

Dazon Dixon Diallo, President and Chief Executive Officer, SisterLove, Inc.
Jamar Rogers, Musician, Dream On Productions, HIV/AIDS Activist
Amirah Sequeira, National Coordinator, Student Global AIDS Campaign
Phill Wilson, President and Chief Executive Officer, Black AIDS Institute

The Mobile Money Revolution

Poverty Alleviation

The mobile phone has dramatically transformed the way in which financial services are offered and who has access to those financial services. For much of the world today, the bank and the mobile phone are one in the same. What began as a microloan payment tool has now expanded into a much more powerful technology, particularly for low-income populations. Mobile money can boost economic activity in high-poverty communities by increasing financial security, transparency, and convenience. Money can be sent to family members in a matter of seconds, compared to several days on a bus. Yet despite the growing penetration of mobile phones, an estimated 80 percent of adults in developing countries are still unbanked. This panel will highlight young people who are developing improved mobile banking technologies, facilitating their adoption, and expanding mobile applications to spur economic growth and innovation where it is needed most.

Reading Materials

Mobile Money Services - Let us in, The Economist
"Mobile Money Revolution Aid's Kenya's Poor, Economy", NPR Radio Broadcast

Moderator:

Tavneet Suri, Associate Professor, MIT Sloan School of Management

Participants:

Fay Arjomandi, Chair, Vodafone Americas Foundation and Chief Executive Officer, Vodafone xone, Vodafone
Khalid Fellahi, Senior Vice President and General Manager, Western Union Digital
Tarek Ghani, Doctoral Candidate, Haas School of Business

Transforming Waste: A New Generation of Ecological Design

Environment and Climate Change

Few communities or nations truly succeed in managing their waste effectively and efficiently. Too many cities around the world do not take advantage of innovative and economic waste management opportunities such as capturing methane, recycling products, creating secondhand markets, or even repurposing stormwater. Meanwhile, human waste poses significant health and sanitation challenges, particularly in less developed regions around the world. Despite the scale and complexity of the problem, there is a wide range of potential and often cost-effective interventions. This panel will focus on creative strategies designed and executed by young leaders who are reusing and repurposing what would otherwise be deemed waste, whether manmade or natural. Panelists will speak to the particular benefits of reuse and repurposing processes as opportunities to spark innovation through income-earning activities that promote improved health conditions, reduce strain on waste management systems, and decrease greenhouse gas emissions.

Reading Materials

What to do about e-waste, NRDC
Recycling 101, NRDC
Composting makes $en$e: Jobs through composting and compost use, Brenda Platt, Institute of Local Self Reliance
California Endangered Species: Plastic Bags, Ian Lovett, The New York Times

Moderator:

Derrick Ashong, Host and Special Correspondent, Fusion

Participants:

Chris Castro, Co-founder, IDEAS For Us
Daniela Ochoa Gonzalez, Zero Waste Coordinator, University of Texas at Austin
Daniel Sopdie, Co-founder and Chief Project Manager, Malindza Project, Social Entrepreneurship Fellow, The Resolution Project

 
Closing Plenary Session
 

5:15 PM -

 6:30 PM


Closing Conversation

Participants:

President Bill Clinton, Founding Chairman, Clinton Global Initiative; 42nd President of the United States
Chelsea Clinton, Vice Chair, Clinton Foundation
Hillary Rodham Clinton, Former U.S. Secretary of State and U.S. Senator from New York
Jimmy Kimmel, Host and Executive Producer, Jimmy Kimmel Live!

 
Networking Event
 

7:00 PM -

 8:30 PM


CGI U Exchange and Dinner

CGI U Exchange is a forum for students, youth organizations, and sponsors to showcase their organizations or Commitments to Action. This exhibition is an ideal opportunity to learn about commitments, explore partnerships, and network with other participants. Exhibitors will be organized by the five CGI U focus areas: Education, Environment and Climate Change, Peace and Human Rights, Poverty Alleviation, and Public Health. CGI U Exchange takes place on Saturday evening in conjunction with dinner; all participants with an official CGI U meeting credential are eligible and encouraged to attend.

Exhibitors are preselected for this opportunity.


 
Office Hours
 

7:00 PM -

 7:45 PM


Office Hours with Select Program Participants

Participants:

Lisa Biagiotti, Journalist and Filmmaker, deepsouth
Eric-Vincent Guichard, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Homestrings
Greg Gunn, Entrepreneur in Residence, City Light Capital
Jay Feely, President, Feely Family Foundation
Deogratias Niyizonkiza, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Village Health Works
Austin Obasohan, Superintendent of Schools, Duplin County Schools
Lauryn Williams, Diplomatic Enterprises, LLC
Phill Wilson, President and Chief Executive Officer, Black AIDS Institute

 

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